Programs

Gary Community Schools offer various academic programs and curricula to help ensure that every Gary child learns in the way that best suits them.

Special education, STEM, high ability and college and career preparatory are just some of the types of education that students and parents involved with Gary schools have from which to choose. In addition to these curricula, Gary Community Schools offer outside the classroom programs like literacy initiatives to provide assistance to students struggling with a specific subject matter. At GCSC, our staff and faculty work hard to make sure that every Gary student succeeds.

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Education Matters 2016

View the documents and handouts that were discussed at this year’s Education Matter Conference.

Curricula

The Gary Community School Corporation provides students of all grade levels with challenging curricula to help keep Gary children academically competitive with those throughout the state of Indiana.

Literacy Initiatives

Programs like MyONBooks and Little Free Library are offered to Gary Community School Corporation students and their families free of charge with enrollment. Literacy initiatives such as these help to ensure that learning does not stop when the school day ends, and that students and families can continue to read and grow at home.

Special Education

The Gary Community School Corporation strives to provide a quality education for students of all abilities. The Special Education program at GCSC helps to educate students between the ages of two and 21 who may have disabilities but wish to learn in a traditional classroom with peers.

Title 1 Part A

Title I is a federal program that provides supplemental resources to schools with high concentrations of students living in poverty, to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards. The program was created in 1965 as a part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and in 2002, Title I was reauthorized as a part of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).

Future Broadcasters of America

Future broadcast journalist can enroll in Broadcasting I and II at the Gary Career Center. Students that remain in the course for two years will earn a total of 6 high school credits. By taking two additional journalism credits at their local high school, they will have the opportunity to earn a Core 40 with Technical Honors Diploma.